Lesson 14: Making Verb Times

Learning how to form verbs of Times 4, 5, and 6

Why learn times 4-6 first?
*** All verbs in the latin language have the same forms for these times, without exceptions!
** There are no different conjugations
* All three are formed from the same root (the 3rd principal part).
As we learned in Lesson 13, the third of the 4 principal verb parts is Time 4, and it will be used to construct times 4, 5, and 6.
As an example, we will use the verb "give", listed as do dare dedi dedidatus,a,um.

Instructions: spend no more than 2-3 minutes memorizing how to form each of the verb times. Then do Homework 9.

    Time 4

  • Take the 3rd principal part of the verb, and use the endings learned in Lesson 2, with the following conditions.
  • You the ** form for you and ye (2nd person)
  • The form for they (3rd person plural) will be different, instead of "-int" it will be "-erunt"
  • In some rare cases, 3rd person plural will also take -ere, e.g. dixere.
I
you
he/she/it
we
ye
them/them
dedi
dedisti **
dedit
dedimus
dedistis **
dederunt

    Time 5

  • Take the 3rd principal part of the verb, and change the ending from 'i' to 'eram'
  • Now use the endings learned in Lesson 2 and all of the endings are regular.
I
you
he/she/it
we
ye
them/them
dederam
dederas
dederat
dederamus
dederatis
dederant

    Time 6

  • Take the 3rd principal part of the verb, and change the ending from 'i' to 'ero'
  • Now use the endings learned in Lesson 2, only you must change that final 'o into an 'i' (the endings are all regular).
I
you
he/she/it
we
ye
them/them
dedero
dederis
dederit
dederimus
dederitis
dederint

N.B.

N.B.
  • How can one find a verb in the dictionary when given only a part of it in a sentence? This is a problem in every language - one has to learn vocabulary because the dictionary doesn't list all the principal parts. E.g. you cannot look up "thought" in the dictionary, it is under "think". Some examples:
    iussero -> iubeo iubere iussi iussus,a,um - to command, order
    iunxit -> iungo iungere iunxi iunctus,a,um - to join, unite
    obstrinxero -> obstringo obstringere obstrinxi obstrictus,a,um - to bind
    tulerunt -> fero ferre tuli latus,a,um - to carry
    This last verb, although it looks highly irregular, is commonly used. E.g. Mary Magdalene: tulerunt Dominum meum - they have taken my Lord (T.4a)
  • "Latin will kill you... if you're not smart." - Fr. Foster

    First Experience Latin - Fr. Reginald Foster

    Return to Index